You asked: Why do we say one nation under God?

Is there a pause between one nation and under God?

There’s no comma- and therefore no pause – in between one nation under God. The issue comes up from time to time, as it did last year in Utah when the State Legislature was debating a bill to honor the date when the phrase “under God” was added to the pledge.

Is under God in the pledge constitutional?

‘Under God’ in Pledge of Allegiance is constitutional, says Massachusetts’s highest court. … (Other courts that have considered the issue under the U.S. Constitution’s Establishment Clause and Equal Protection Clause have generally held the same; see, for instance, Newdow v. Rio Linda Union School Dist. (9th Cir.

What is the proper way to say the pledge?

The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag: “I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”, should be rendered by standing at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart.

Is In God We Trust constitutional?

Since 1956 “In God We Trust” has been the official motto of the United States. … Though opponents argue that the phrase amounts to a governmental endorsement of religion and thus violates the establishment clause of the First Amendment, federal courts have consistently upheld the constitutionality of the national motto.

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Is the pledge in the Constitution?

U.S. Congress (9th Cir. June 26, 2002), that the Pledge of Allegiance’s use of the express religious reference ‘under God’ violates the First Amendment to the Constitution, and that, therefore, a school district’s policy and practice of teacher-led voluntary recitations of the Pledge of Allegiance is unconstitutional.

Is the Pledge religious?

“It is a profession of a religious belief, namely, a belief in monotheism.” That violates the Constitutional separation between church and state, the court ruled, meaning the Pledge in its current form cannot be recited officially in public schools or government offices.