Which philosophers dont believe in God?

Do all philosophers believe in God?

Some philosophers – not most but a significant minority, including members of the Society of Christian Philosophers – believe in God. … Claims about the existence and nature of God are, rather, controversial to philosophers, including Christian philosophers.

Did any Greek philosophers believe in God?

There are many different Greek philosophers, and they all had different ideas and attitudes towards the gods. Plato is addressed well in the other answers: He often spoke of “God” and believed in spirits, but not necessarily in the myths about the gods.

What percentage of philosophers believe in God?

8. God: atheism 72.8%; theism 14.6%; other 12.6%. 9.

Are there any scientists who believe in God?

Is it possible to be a scientist and to believe in God? The answer is yes. There are innumerable examples of eminent scientists, both past and present, who believe in God.

Which Greek philosopher was an atheist?

Most histories of atheism choose the Greek and Roman philosophers Epicurus, Democritus, and Lucretius as the first atheist writers. While these writers certainly changed the idea of God, they didn’t entirely deny that gods could exist.

Did the Greeks literally believe in the gods?

The vast majority of people in ancient Greece really believed in the Greek gods, but there were some dissenters who questioned traditional ideas about the gods and a few people who were not completely sure about the gods’ existence.

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Did Socrates believe heaven?

No heaven and hell (in the Medieval sense) in Ancient Greece. See Greek underworld for the original Greek idea of afterlife. No reason to assert that Socrates believed in reincarnation.

Does Plato believe in God?

To Plato, God is transcendent-the highest and most perfect being-and one who uses eternal forms, or archetypes, to fashion a universe that is eternal and uncreated. The order and purpose he gives the universe is limited by the imperfections inherent in material.