Question: Why Luke addressed his Gospel to Theophilus?

Why did Luke write his Gospel to Theophilus?

As Priscilla and Aquila took Apollos aside and ‘explained the Way of God to him more accurately’ (Ac 18:26, NRSV), so Luke writes his first book for Theophilus so that he might know the certain truth regarding Jesus and his teachings.

Who is Theophilus and why is he important?

Theophilus, (died January 20, 842, Constantinople), Eastern Roman emperor (829–842), principal promoter of the 9th-century Byzantine renascence of learning and the last advocate of the Eastern heresy of Iconoclasm (the destruction of religious images) in a reign beset by Arab invasions.

Who did Luke write his Gospel for and why?

Luke’s Gospel is clearly written for Gentile converts: it traces Christ’s genealogy, for example, back to Adam, the “father” of the human race rather than to Abraham, the father of the Jewish people. The date and place of composition are uncertain, but many date the Gospel to 63–70 ce, others somewhat later.

How is Luke’s first letter connected with his second?

What three ways is Luke’s first letter connected with his second? The first is a beginning, while the second is a continuation. The first speaks of the baptism of John, the second, of Spirit baptism. The first ends with Christ’s ascension and the disciples waiting in Jerusalem, the second begins with these same events.

IT IS INTERESTING:  What is the biggest sin to God?

What is the role of Theophilus in the Bible?

Luke gave to his friend, Theophilus, an ongoing account of how the followers of Christ continued the witness and work of Christ under the power and guidance of the Holy Spirit. Dr. Luke invested all of his effort and energy in this one man to bear witness to him and to disciple him.

WHO WAS acts written to?

Like Luke, Acts is addressed to the unknown reader Theophilus, and in the introduction to Acts, it is made clear that it is a continuation of Luke: “In the first book, Theophilus, I wrote about all that Jesus did and taught from the beginning until the day he was taken up to heaven” (1:1–2).

When was the book of Luke and Acts written?

Acts and the Gospel of Luke make up a two-part work, Luke–Acts, by the same anonymous author. It is usually dated to around 80–90 AD, although some scholars suggest 90–110.