The Lords’ Prayer in the original Aramaic language (which Jesus spoke)

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“The Lords Prayer has significance to many who follow particular religious faiths, but did you know that the original Aramaic language it was written in can be/has been interpreted in indifferent ways?  Each version has its own beauty. 

“The Aramaic Language has (like the Hebrew and Arabic) different levels of meaning. The words are organized and defined by a poetical system where different meanings of every word are possible. So, every line of the Lords Prayer could be translated into English in many different versions. As an example of how the intent of a passage can be changed, here are some translations of the Lord’s Prayer directly translated from the ancient Aramaic language into modern English.”*

Some of the direct translations from Aramaic  (The language that Jesus spoke) are so poetic and beautiful, they remind me of the devotional, spiritual  poems by Rumi.

Here is the original prayer in Aramaic:

Aramaic tile

The Prayer to Our Father in the Original Aramaic

Abwûn- O cosmic Birther, from whom the breath of life comes,

d’bwaschmâja -who fills all realms of sound, light and vibration.

Nethkâdasch schmach -May Your light be experienced in my utmost holiest.

Têtê malkuthach. -Your Heavenly Domain approaches.

Nehwê tzevjânach aikâna d’bwaschmâja af b’arha.- Let Your will come true in the universe (all that vibrates) just as on earth (that is material and dense).

Hawvlân lachma d’sûnkanân jaomâna. -Give us wisdom (understanding, assistance) for our daily need,

Waschboklân chaubên wachtahên aikâna daf chnân schwoken l’chaijabên. – detach the fetters of faults that bind us, like we let go the guilt of others.

Wela tachlân l’nesjuna -Let us not be lost in superficial things (materialism, common temptations),

ela patzân min bischa. -but let us be freed from that what keeps us off from our true purpose.

Metol dilachie malkutha wahaila wateschbuchta l’ahlâm almîn. -From You comes the all-working will, the lively strength to act, the song that beautifies all and renews itself from age to age.

Amên.- Sealed in trust, faith and truth. (I confirm with my entire being)

Avvon d-bish-maiya, nith-qaddash shim-mukh.

Tih-teh mal-chootukh. Nih-weh çiw-yanukh:

ei-chana d’bish-maiya: ap b’ar-ah.

Haw lan lakh-ma d’soonqa-nan yoo-mana.

O’shwooq lan kho-bein:

ei-chana d’ap kh’nan shwiq-qan l’khaya-ween.

Oo’la te-ellan l’niss-yoona:
il-la paç-çan min beesha.

Mid-til de-di-lukh hai mal-choota
oo khai-la oo tush-bookh-ta
l’alam al-mein. 

Aa-meen.

Oh Thou, from whom the breath of life comes, who fills all realms of sound, light and vibration.
May Your light be experienced in my utmost holiest.
Your Heavenly Domain approaches.
Let Your will come true – in the universe (all that vibrates) just as on earth (that is material and dense).
Give us wisdom (understanding, assistance) for our daily need, detach the fetters of faults that bind us,  like we let go the guilt of others.
Let us not be lost in superficial things (materialism, common temptations), but let us be freed from that what keeps us from our true purpose.
From You comes the all-working will, the lively strength to act, the song that beautifies all and renews itself from age to age.

Sealed in trust, faith and truth.
(I confirm with my entire being)

 

The original translations from the Greek, as Mathew wrote it in a crude translation, from which it was then translated to Latin, later on the early Church, the Christians living in the eastern half of the Roman Empire added the doxology (“For thine is the kingdom” etc) to the Gospel text of the Our Father when reciting the prayer at Mass.

Later on The English wording of the Our Father that is used today reflects the version mandated for use by Henry VIII, which was based on the English version of the Bible produced by Tyndale. More changes were done through the years, and the English version without the doxology of the Our Father became accepted throughout the English-speaking world, even though the later English translations of the Bible including the Catholic Douay-Rheims (1610) and Protestant King James versions (1611) had different renderings of prayers as found in the Gospel of St. Matthew. Later on, the Catholic Church made slight modifications in the English: “who art” replaced “which art,” and “on earth” replaced “in earth.” 

*To find out more about the history of the changes through the centuries, the different translations  and all the interpretations and additions from one language to another, you can visit: http://www.thenazareneway.com/lords_prayer.htm

2 Comments Add yours

  1. LindaP says:

    Interesting! Though slightly different interpretations message remains the same! Great post Amira!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, so true, the essence of the message remains the same, no matter the translation it’s truly beautiful and powerful. ❤

      Like

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